Category Archives: WOD Wednesdays

My WOD

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I wanna do the splits!

I found this on Pinterest. I’m gonna try this out for a few weeks and see if it helps.

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WOD Wednesday

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WOD Wednesday

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WOD Wednesdays: How to Double Your Endurance in 6 Weeks

20121007-061205.jpgYou will probably see a lot more things about running from me now that it’s cooler outside. I’m a seasonal runner, I only like to run September-April before it gets really hot here in GA. The rest of the time I avoid outdoor running like the plague.

From Jeff Galloway • Runner’s World

Imagine running twice as far as you do now. Mission impossible? It’s easier than you think. And there’s good reason to try. Adding more miles can boost your stamina, help manage your weight, and help you get more comfortable on the road. Here’s how.

Shoot For Three

A three-day running week is the best way to run more and stay injury-free. When you rest before and after a running day, your muscles feel fresher and you’ll have more energy to go farther.

Make Every Mile Count

Giving each run a purpose will help you keep up your routine without getting stale. Designate one day for a “maintenance” run (an easy-paced run that helps maintain fitness), another day to run long, and a third day for speed play (aka “fartlek”). On this run, set out at your usual pace, and pick up the tempo when you feel ready. You might accelerate to a landmark you see ahead, like a tree. Then jog to recover. Take off again when you’re ready.

Slow Down

On your long run, slow the pace from the start to cut your chances of getting exhausted — or hurt. Your pace should be about three minutes per mile slower than it is on a maintenance run. So if you usually run a 10-minute mile, aim for a 13-minute pace when you run long. Take a one-minute walk break every one to three minutes.

Go the Distance

How to build your mileage slowly:

Week ONE:
Maintenance (Miles) – 3.5
Fartlek (Miles) – 3
Long Run (Miles) – 4

Week TWO:
Maintenance (Miles) – 4
Fartlek (Miles) – 3.25
Long Run (Miles) – 5

Week THREE:
Maintenance (Miles) – 4
Fartlek (Miles) – 3
Long Run (Miles) – 4

Week FOUR:
Maintenance (Miles) – 5
Fartlek (Miles) – 3.5
Long Run (Miles) – 6

Week FIVE:
Maintenance (Miles) – 5.5
Fartlek (Miles) – 3
Long Run (Miles) – 4

Week SIX:
Maintenance (Miles) – 6
Fartlek (Miles) – 3.5
Long Run (Miles) – 7

WOD Wednesdays: 50/50 Workout

This comes from my friend Corey over at Fitness as a Lifestyle he’s a personal trainer here in Atlanta. Try The 50/50 Workout! Time Yourself,No Breaks,Try To Beat 5 Minutes!

50 – Jumping Jacks
40 – High Knees
30 – Squat Jumps
20 – Push Ups
10 – Burpee’s

….REPEAT X 2 THEN END WITH A 1 MINUTE PLANK…

WOD Wednesdays: Workout Your Mind

Meditation: A simple, fast way to reduce stress

Elements of meditation

Different types of meditation may include different features to help you meditate. These may vary depending on whose guidance you follow or who’s teaching a class. Some of the most common features in meditation include:

Focused attention. Focusing your attention is generally one of the most important elements of meditation. Focusing your attention is what helps free your mind from the many distractions that cause stress and worry. You can focus your attention on such things as a specific object, an image, a mantra, or even your breathing.
Relaxed breathing. This technique involves deep, even-paced breathing using the diaphragm muscle to expand your lungs. The purpose is to slow your breathing, take in more oxygen, and reduce the use of shoulder, neck and upper chest muscles while breathing so that you breathe more efficiently.
A quiet setting. If you’re a beginner, practicing meditation may be easier if you’re in a quiet spot with few distractions — no television, radios or cellphones. As you get more skilled at meditation, you may be able to do it anywhere, especially in high-stress situations where you benefit the most from meditation, such as a traffic jam, a stressful work meeting or a long line at the grocery store.
A comfortable position. You can practice meditation whether you’re sitting, lying down, walking or in other positions or activities. Just try to be comfortable so that you can get the most out of your meditation.
Everyday ways to practice meditation

Don’t let the thought of meditating the “right” way add to your stress. Sure, you can attend special meditation centers or group classes led by trained instructors. But you also can practice meditation easily on your own.

And you can make meditation as formal or informal as you like — whatever suits your lifestyle and situation. Some people build meditation into their daily routine. For example, they may start and end each day with an hour of meditation. But all you really need is a few minutes of quality time for meditation.

Here are some ways you can practice meditation on your own, whenever you choose:

Breathe deeply. This technique is good for beginners because breathing is a natural function. Focus all attention on your breathing. Concentrate on feeling and listening as you inhale and exhale through your nostrils. Breathe deeply and slowly. When your attention wanders, gently return your focus to your breathing.
Scan your body. When using this technique, focus attention on different parts of your body. Become aware of your body’s various sensations, whether that’s pain, tension, warmth or relaxation. Combine body scanning with breathing exercises and imagine breathing heat or relaxation into and out of different parts of your body.
Repeat a mantra. You can create your own mantra, whether it’s religious or secular. Examples of religious mantras include the Jesus Prayer in the Christian tradition, the holy name of God in Judaism, or the om mantra of Hinduism, Buddhism and other Eastern religions.
Walk and meditate. Combining a walk with meditation is an efficient and healthy way to relax. You can use this technique anywhere you’re walking — in a tranquil forest, on a city sidewalk or at the mall. When you use this method, slow down the pace of walking so that you can focus on each movement of your legs or feet. Don’t focus on a particular destination. Concentrate on your legs and feet, repeating action words in your mind such as lifting, moving and placing as you lift each foot, move your leg forward and place your foot on the ground.
Engage in prayer. Prayer is the best known and most widely practiced example of meditation. Spoken and written prayers are found in most faith traditions. You can pray using your own words or read prayers written by others. Check the self-help or 12-step-recovery section of your local bookstore for examples. Talk with your rabbi, priest, pastor or other spiritual leader about resources.
Read and reflect. Many people report that they benefit from reading poems or sacred texts, and taking a few moments to quietly reflect on their meaning. You also can listen to sacred music, spoken words or any music you find relaxing or inspiring. You may want to write your reflections in a journal or discuss them with a friend or spiritual leader.
Focus your love and gratitude. In this type of meditation, you focus your attention on a sacred object or being, weaving feelings of love and gratitude into your thoughts. You can also close your eyes and use your imagination or gaze at representations of the object.
Building your meditation skills

Don’t judge your meditation skills, which may only increase your stress. Meditation takes practice. Keep in mind, for instance, that it’s common for your mind to wander during meditation, no matter how long you’ve been practicing meditation. If you’re meditating to calm your mind and your attention wanders, slowly return to the object, sensation or movement you’re focusing on.

Experiment, and you’ll likely find out what types of meditation work best for you and what you enjoy doing. Adapt meditation to your needs at the moment. Remember, there’s no right way or wrong way to meditate. What matters is that meditation helps you with stress reduction and feeling better overall.